Fr. Dannemann. How Did Our Picture of the World Arise?

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Author(s) Lenin
Written 1915


MIA-bannière.gif
Source: Lenin Collected Works, 4th Edition, Moscow, 1976, Volume 38, pp. 331-332
Publisher: Progress Publishers
First Published: 1930 in Lenin Miscellany XII. Published according to the manuscript

The remarks on Fr. Dannemann’s book “Wie unser Weltbild entstand” (Kosmos). Stuttgart, 1912 [F. Dannemann, How Did Our Picture of the World Arise (Cosmos), Stuttgart, 1912] were written by Lenin in a notebook preceding the conspectus of G. Noël’s Hegel’s Logic.


FR. DANNEMANN. HOW DID OUR PICTURE

OF THE WORLD ARISE?

(KOSMOS). STUTTGART, 1912

(Nat. XII. 456)
In this pamphlet the author gives a kind of summary

of his four-volume work:Naturwissenschaf-

ten in ihrer Entwicklung und in ihrem

Zusammenhange”...

About 5,000 years of the development

of civilisation from ancient Egypt to our

time. According to Homer, the world was
(((Much pop-ularisa-

tion...)))

only the Mediterranean Sea and surround-

ing countries. (P. 8)[1]


In Egypt the clear nights facilitated

the pursuit of astronomy. They observed

the stars and their movement, the moon,

etc.
The author

carelessly,

pompously,

vulgarly, in

feuilleton

style outlines

philosophical

questions,

banal.
At first the month was reckoned as 30days, and the year as 360 (p. 31). The an-

cient Egyptians already had 365 days.

(P. 32) Eratosthenes (276 B.C.) determined

the circumference of the earth as 250,000

“stadia” = 45,000 km. (instead of 40,000).


Aristarchus guessed that the earth re-

volved round the sun, p. 37 (1,800 years

before Copernicus, 1473-1543). (Third cen-

tury B.C.) he considered the moon to be

3 0 (instead of 48) times smaller than

the earth, and the sun to be 300 (instead

of 1,300,000) times larger than the earth....

The booklet

is neither

here nor

there: for a

philosophical

work it is

careless, sen-

tentious, pet-

ty, banal;—

for a popular

work it is

pretentious.

Ptolemy’s system (second

century A.D.)

fifteenth century: the

revival of astronomy—con-

nection with navigation.


Copernicus (1473-1543):

heliocentric system. Circles

(not ellipses).


((Only in the middle of

the nineteenth century im-

proved measuring instru

ments showed alteration in

the appearance of the fixed

stars))


Galileo—(1564-1642).

Kepler—(1571-1630).

Newton—(1643-1727).

the telescope

and so forth

((discovery

of more than

20 million

stars, etc.))

flattening

of the earth

at the poles

— 1/229 dia-

meter |instead

of 1/299|

Pythagoras (sixth centu-

ry B.C.) the world is gov-

erned by number: and mea-

sure....


The four elements, sub-

stances, of the ancient phi-

losophers: earth, fire, water,

air....


Democritus (fifth centu-

ry B.C.): atoms...

seventeenth century:

chemical elements.


Spectral analysis (1860)

Electricity, etc.

Law of conservation of

force.

  1. Dannemann, Fr., Wie unser Weltbild entstand? Stuttgart, 1912.—Ed.