Letter to Lev Kamenev, After November 25, 1912

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Author(s) Lenin
Written 25 November 1912


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Written after November 25, 1912
Published: First published in 1964 in Collected Works, Fifth (Russian) Ed., Vol. 48. Sent from Cracow to Paris. Printed from the original.
Source: Lenin Collected Works, Progress Publishers, 1977, Moscow, Volume 43, pages 309b-310a.
Keywords : Letter, Lev Kamenev

Dear L. B.,

I am furious with you for your carelessness: you did not arrange for letters from the congress!! But of that another time. You made Koba lose most precious time.

Now to the point. In my opinion you handled things in Basle—under the circumstances—superbly. It couldn’t have been done better. There couldn’t have been a better occasion to unmask the liquidators. (I gathered—for you “haven’t finished” your letter yet!—that the I.S.B. did not examine at all the division of votes). The outcome was a tie, and this was the best outcome with the present balance of strength....[1] The question of the “nationals” was, in my opinion, in place, like all the three questions. In a word, as regards the main thing—félicitations les plus chaleureuses!

Why was Muranov’s signature missing? For the telegram was on Sunday!![2]

So far we have seen two of the six: Malinovsky and Muranov. Impression excellent.... The soil is rich, but a great deal of work is needed....


P.S. In my opinion, parity can be agreed to, but you must put forward one condition: rejection of Haase because of bias and insulting behaviour in the Bureau.

It is our legitimate right and moral duty to reject his candidacy. And politically it is clear... hatching a malicious intrigue against us....

  1. Manuscript partly damaged. Here and further several words illegible.—Ed.
  2. A reference to the signing by M. K. Muranov, a deputy to the Fourth Duma, of a letter From the Social-Democratic Duma group protesting against war. A telegram announcing that Muranov was ad ding his signature was sent by Lenin to Basle on November 24 (N. S.), 1912.