The Civil War in the United States

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Date of beginning 1861
Date of end 1862


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The Civil War in the United States is a collection of articles on the American Civil War by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels for the New-York Tribune and Die Presse of Vienna between 1861 and 1862, and correspondence between Marx and Engels between 1860 and 1866. It was published as a book in 1937, edited and with an introduction by Richard Enmale.

In 2016 International Publishers produced a completely revised second edition of The Civil War in the United States, edited and with an introduction by Andrew Zimmerman.

PDF available here
 Texts published in The Civil War in the United StatesAuthorDate
The American Question in England (October 1861)Karl MarxOct 1861




I. Articles from the New York Daily Tribune (1861–1862) - Marx[edit source]

  1. The American Question in England
  2. The British Cotton Trade
  3. The London Times on the Orleans Princes in America
  4. The Intervention in Mexico
  5. The News and its Effect in London
  6. Progress of Feeling in England
  7. English Public Opinion

II. Articles from the Vienna Presse (1861–1862) - Marx and Engels[edit source]

  1. The North American Civil War
  2. The Civil War in the United States
  3. The Crisis in England
  4. Economic Notes
  5. Intervention in Mexico
  6. The Dismissal of Frémont
  7. The Trent Case
  8. The Anglo-American Conflict
  9. The Principal Actors in the Trent Drama
  10. The Controversies over the Trent Case
  11. The Washington Cabinet and the Western Powers
  12. The Opinion of the Journals and the Opinion of the People
  13. French News Humbug. Economic Consequences of War
  14. A Pro-America Meeting
  15. The History of Seward’s Suppressed Dispatch
  16. A Coup d’Etat of Lord John Russell
  17. A London Workers’ Meeting
  18. Anti-Intervention Feeling
  19. On the Cotton Crisis
  20. The Parliamentary Debate on the Address
  21. American Affairs
  22. The Secessionists’ Friends in the Lower House. Recognition of the American Blockade
  23. The American Civil War [I]
  24. The American Civil War [II]
  25. An International Affaire Mirès
  26. The English Press and the Fall of New Orleans
  27. A Treaty Against the Slave Trade
  28. The Situation in the American Theater of War
  29. English Humanity and America
  30. A Suppressed Debate on Mexico and the Alliance with France
  31. A Criticism of American Affairs
  32. Abolitionist Demonstrations in America
  33. The Situation in North America
  34. The Dismissal of McClellan
  35. English Neutrality—The Situation in the Southern States

III. Correspondence between Marx and Engels (1860-1866)[edit source]

  1. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, January 11, 1860
  2. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, January 26, 1860
  3. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, January 7, 1861
  4. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, June 9, 1861
  5. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, June 12, 1861
  6. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, July 1, 1861
  7. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, July 3, 1861
  8. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, July 5, 1861
  9. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, November 27, 1861
  10. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, December 9, 1861
  11. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, December 19, 1861
  12. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, March 3, 1862
  13. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, March 5, 1862
  14. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, March 6, 1862
  15. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, April 28, 1862
  16. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, May 5, 1862
  17. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, May 6, 1862
  18. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, May 12, 1862
  19. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, May 23, 1862
  20. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, May 27, 1862
  21. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, May 29, 1862
  22. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, June 4, 1862
  23. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, July 30, 1862
  24. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, July 30, 1862
  25. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, August 7, 1862
  26. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, September 9, 1862
  27. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, September 10, 1862
  28. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, October 16, 1862
  29. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, October 29, 1862
  30. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, November 5, 1862
  31. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, November 15, 1862
  32. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, November 17, 1862
  33. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, November 20, 1862
  34. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, December 30, 1862
  35. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, January 2, 1863
  36. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, February 13, 1863
  37. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, February 17, 1863
  38. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, March 24, 1863
  39. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, June 11, 1863
  40. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, July 6, 1863
  41. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, August 15, 1863
  42. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, May 26, 1864
  43. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, May 30, 1864
  44. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, June 7, 1864
  45. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, June 9, 1864
  46. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, September 4, 1864
  47. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, September 7, 1864
  48. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, November 9, 1864
  49. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, December 2, 1864
  50. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, February 6, 1865.
  51. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, February 7, 1865.
  52. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, February 10, 1865.
  53. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, March 4, 1865
  54. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, April 16, 1865
  55. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, May 1, 1865
  56. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, May 3, 1865
  57. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, May 9, 1865
  58. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, May 20, 1865
  59. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, June 24, 1865
  60. Friedrich Engels to Karl Marx, July 15, 1865
  61. Karl Marx to Friedrich Engels, April 23, 1866

Appendix[edit source]

  1. Address of the International Workingmen’s Association to Abraham Lincoln
  2. The American Ambassador’s Reply to Address of the International Workingmen’s Association
  3. Address of the International Workingmen’s Association to President Johnson


  1. On this point compare Marx with L. B. Schmidt. See the latter’s article on “The Influence of Wheat and Cotton on Anglo-American Relations during the Civil War” in Iowa Journal of History and Politics, vol. xvi, no. 3 (July, 1918), pp. 400–439. See also E. D. Fite, Social and Industrial Conditions in the North during the Civil War (New York, 1910), p. 21.
  2. E. Channing, History of the United States (New York, 1925), vol. vi.